When Someone Gets It

The best, most useful analogy you can use to understand homosexuality is heterosexuality.

A powerfully written piece from a layman’s perspective.

http://www.evangelicalsforsocialaction.org/oriented-to-love-sexual-justice/homosexuality-whats-next-for-the-conservative-evangelical-church/

-Trevor

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The Love of a Woman

We are still a thing. We are still together.

You might say it’s an answer to prayer. Or a miracle. Or luck. Or hard work.

You would be right in all that.

I say it’s also because of the love of a woman.

The love of a good woman who daily reminds me of the good in my world and my life. That love keeps me focused of the most important priorities and helps me ignor the temptation to dwell on the lesser and harmful things around me.

The love of a faithful woman who continues to walk beside me in true companionship. That love keeps me grounded in the right relationships.

The love of a Godly woman who displays a heart that longs to know more about her Father and grow in His grace. That love points me to my ultimate worth that transcends all earthly existence.

We didn’t know if we would make it through the first days of this journey…then the first weeks…first months…but now a few years into it, we continue to live and love each other in the midst of this journey. Due, in large part, to love.

The love of a good, faithful, and Godly woman.

My wife.

My treasure.

-Trevor

Moving Past The “But”

Growing up, I learned God loved me. A whole lot. I was special, gifted, and He had a plan for my life.

Growing up, I learned that my family loved me. A whole lot. I was special, talented, and they had high hopes for me.

But…except…well, you see…there’s this little thing.

I could make God and my family love me more.

I just needed to try harder. I had to fit into the mysterious shaped hole in the human atmosphere that had been predetermined for me and left for me to struggle to discover and conform to. If I said the right things, did the right things, dressed in the right way, joined with the right people, claimed the right experiences, and avoided all the “wrongs” of those I would be loved more.

These days, I’m finding great freedom by relenquishing my hold on the “but.” I’m living in a freedom of just being me.

Well, at least to a point.

With God, nothing is hidden. I believe that God knows all about me, and nothing that He knows could possibly make Him love me any less. Period. Here, the “but” is nonexistent. No need to carry it.

With my family, many know all the good, bad, and ugly. And I believe they love me unconditionally in spite of all that. Others of my family, if they were to know all the bad and ugly stuff, would still love me, but that love would be strained and its expression forced. Here, the “but” is always in play. It is a constant.

I probably won’t ever be able to fully move past the “but” in this life. But, I believe, at the dawning of the next it will have faded into obscurity.

-Trevor

 

Ground Zero

I was at Ground Zero. In the eerie silence of a city teeming with millions, I looked into the abyss and tried to imagine the agony of that moment. So many would never see what would rise from the ashes in that place just a few feet away. New beginnings…new resolve…new commitments.

We visit Ground Zero to remember, then rise again.

Every day I am at my Ground Zero. In the eerie silence of my hectic, noisy life, I stare into the abyss and relive those painful moments that brought my world crashing down. So many see only the destruction. But, I am living new beginnings…new resolve…new commitments.

I visit my Ground Zero to remember, then rise again.

And I will.

-Trevor

Pain

Pain.

Pain in the moment.

A song to sing, a story to tell.

A sojourner’s heart to bind and heal.

Pain.

Pain in the memory.

That should be my happy wife.

That should be my faith community.

Pain.

Opportunity lost in the moments and the memories.

In the constant.

In the change.

My companion.

Pain.

No.

No.

It wasn’t worth it.

The yielding wasn’t worth it.

It wasn’t worth the loss of the intimacy of my marriage.

It wasn’t worth the lack of trust of my children.

It wasn’t worth the loss of my ministry.

It wasn’t worth the lack of a purposeful life.

It wasn’t worth the loss of a God who was close by.

It wasn’t worth never being where I was.

It wasn’t worth never being what we were.

No, it wasn’t worth it.

No.

-Trevor